Welcome to South African Toilet Organisation

SATO is a Member of the World Toilet Organisation

We aim to:

  1. Improve the quality of human life,
  2. Ensure dignity for all South Africans especially woman and children,
  3. Contribute to reduction of high levels of crime,
  4. Drastically reduce the child mortality rate , and
  5. Promote the implementation of environmentally save sanitation solutions to protect our fresh water and other natural resources.

The result is a win-win situation which will assist in:

  1. The eradication of poverty,
  2. Increased levels of health,
  3. Reduced levels of crime,
  4. Improve bottom-line for commercial organizations while serving public causes and in specific the provision of basic services such as water and sanitation and by doing so ensure Dignity for all.

   

“According to the World Health Organisation, a child under the age of five dies every 15 seconds due to diseases as a result of poor or no sanitation. It is estimated that nearly 1.5 million Children die every year of diarrhea (more) Approximately 133 million children under the age of five will die before the end of 2030. In 2007 the child mortality rate in South Africa accounted for more than 40 000 children or one child every 15 minutes.”

TODAY`S MARKET FOR SANITATION IS DYSFUNCTIONAL, MAINLY DUE TO MUTED DEMAND AND LOW PRIORITY AMONG INDIVIDUALS. MARKET BASED APPROACH IS REQUIRED TO ADDRESS THE PROBLEM AT GRASS ROOT LEVEL AND AT A LARGE SCALE… JACK SIM FOUNDER OF THE WORLD TOILET ORGANISATION

SATO is a non-profit organization committed to improving toilet and sanitation conditions on the African Continent. SATO is also one of the few organizations to focus on toilets instead of water, which receives more attention and resources under the common subject of sanitation. SATO was founded to work towards eliminating the toilet taboo and delivering sustainable sanitation to Africans.

Important Facts: The world is still on track for reaching the MDG drinking water target, but the trend appears to be deteriorating. On current trends, the world will miss the sanitation target by more than half a billion people.
    1. Every year, unsafe water, coupled with a lack of basic sanitation, kills at least 1.6 million children under the age of five years more than eight times the number of people who died in the Asian tsunami of 2004.
    2. At the beginning of the Water for Life decade, 1.1 billion people did not have access to an improved source of drinking water.
    3. 84% of the population without access to an improved source of drinking water live in rural areas.
    4. 2.6 billion people, more than 40% of the world population, do not use a toilet, but defecate in the open or in unsanitary places.
    5. If the current trend persists, nearly 1.7 billion rural dwellers will still not have access to improved sanitation by 2015.
    6. In 2004, urban sanitation coverage was more than double the rural sanitation coverage.
    7. Although 73% of rural dwellers have access to an improved source of drinking water, only 30% have access to piped water in the home.
Keeping up with the population increase is a major challenge for urban areas; maintaining current coverage levels till 2015 requires serving 700 million urban dwellers over the coming decade.
    1. Migration from rural to urban areas poses a major challenge for city planners; extending basic drinking water and sanitation services to periurban and slum areas to reach the poorest people is of the utmost importance to prevent outbreaks of cholera and other water-related diseases in these often overcrowded places.
    2. Urban drinking water coverage has remained at 95% since 1990. Urban sanitation coverage has increased by only one percentage point, from 79% to 80%.
    3. About 770 million and 700 million urban people gained access to improved drinking water and sanitation, respectively, during 1990-2004.
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